Talcum Powder Cancer Lawsuits Begin First Trial In California

   

Thousands of Talcum Powder Cancer Lawsuits Allege Women Develop Ovarian Cancer After Prolonged Use Of Johnson & Johnson’s Talcum Powder Products.

Talcum Powder Ovarian Cancer Lawsuit TrialAfter more than a year of talcum powder cancer lawsuit trials in Missouri ending in over $300 million in losses for Johnson & Johnson, another trial began in California this week. This ovarian cancer lawsuit trial involves a 63-year-old woman who was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 207 and used Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder and Shower to Shower for years as part of her daily feminine hygiene routine.

In January, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Maren E. Nelson, the presiding trial judge, granted a request to allow the lawsuit to go to trial first because of the woman’s deteriorating health. Bellwether trials are “test trials” that help both sides determine the outcome of future trials or consider the possibility of settling other lawsuits pending in the litigation. (Johnson & Johnson Talcum Powder Lawsuits Case No. BC628228, Superior Court of the State of California, County of Los Angeles)

“Unfortunately, the development of ovarian cancer from talcum powder use is devastating to women, and we hope jurors continue to find in favor for them and their families” says Dr. François Blaudeau, founder of Southern Med Law, who is an attorney and a practicing obstetrician/ gynecologist.

This talcum powder lawsuit is being tried in the Los Angeles Superior Court and is similar to thousands pending litigation in state and federal courts. The complaints all allege prolonged genital hygiene use of Johnson & Johnson’s Shower to Shower and Baby Powder causes ovarian cancer. The lawsuits also accuse J&J of failing to adequately warn about the cancer risks associated with its talcum powder products.

J&J Baby Powder and Shower to Shower are talc based products. Talc is a naturally occurring mineral made up of magnesium, silicon, and oxygen. It is a popular consumer product that can absorb moisture and reduce friction. Talcum powder cancer lawsuits assert that studies conducted since the 1970s have shown that regular use of talc can cause ovarian cancer in women. The American Cancer Society suggests that ovarian cancer is developed when talc particles applied to the genital area travel through the vagina, uterus, and fallopian tubes to the ovary.
[cancer.org/cancer/cancer-causes/talcum-powder-and-cancer.html]

Over the past year, trials were held in the 22nd Circuit Court in St. Louis involving other talcum powder cancer lawsuits against Johnson & Johnson. The trials involved women diagnosed with ovarian cancer after years of talcum powder use. In February 2016, a jury awarded $72 million to the family of an Alabama woman who died of ovarian cancer in 2015. (Talcum Powder Cancer Lawsuit Case No. 1422-CC09012-01) A South Dakota woman was awarded $55 million in May 2016 and a California woman was awarded $70 million in October. (Case No. 1422-CC09012-02, Case No. 1422-CC09012-01) The largest verdict of $110 million was awarded in May 2017 to a Virginia woman whose trial was advanced due to her deteriorating health. (Case No. 1422-CC09326-01)

About Southern Med Law And Filing A Talcum Powder Cancer Lawsuit

Southern Med Law is led by Dr. François a, an attorney and a practicing obstetrician/ gynecologist. The firm’s legal staff possess a deep understanding of the complex medical and legal questions at issue in talcum powder ovarian cancer lawsuits. Southern Med Law’s attorneys are not afraid to take on the nation’s largest corporations in their pursuit of justice, and are committed to ensuring that all victims have access to the type of aggressive legal advocacy that assures success.

Southern Med Law
François M. Blaudeau, MD JD FACHE FCLM Esquire
2224 1st Avenue North
Birmingham, Alabama 35203
Phone: (205) 547-5525
Fax: (205) 547-5526
francois@southernmedlaw.com
Medical Negligence/MedicalDevice/Pharma/Qui Tam
www.southenmedlaw.com
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

This entry was posted in Southern Med Law | Article. Bookmark the permalink.